The comfort to know that any tragedy may even lead to your higher purpose

When talking about health-issues, someone recently did recommend to me the book “You can heal your life” by Louise Hay, which I want to pass onto you.
Additionally I want to share a tragic story about a little boy who did cause an accident which then made him go blind. Whilst this is any parent’s nightmare, what I just read on Wikipedia, made me re-evaluate my narrow-minded pity which only was focussed on enabling all of us to “enjoy life to the fullest” by replacing it with a higher purpose:

Louis Braille was born in Coupvray, a small town about twenty miles east of Paris, on 4 January 1809. He and his three elder siblings – Monique Catherine (b. 1793), Louis-Simon (b. 1795), and Marie Céline (b. 1797) – lived with their parents, Simon-René and Monique, on three hectares of land and vineyards in the countryside. Simon-René maintained a successful enterprise as a leatherer and maker of horse tack.

As soon as he could walk, Braille spent time playing in his father’s workshop. At the age of three, the child was playing with some of the tools, trying to make holes in a piece of leather with an awl. Squinting closely at the surface, he pressed down hard to drive the point in, and the awl glanced across the tough leather and struck him in one of his eyes. A local physician bound and patched the affected eye and even arranged for Braille to be met the next day in Paris by a surgeon, but no treatment could save the damaged organ. In agony, the young boy suffered for weeks as the wound became severely infected; an infection which then spread to his other eye, likely due to sympathetic ophthalmia.

Louis Braille survived the torment of the infection but by the age of five he was completely blind in both eyes. Due to his young age, Braille did not realize at first that he had lost his sight, and often asked why it was always dark. His parents made many efforts – quite uncommon for the era – to raise their youngest child in a normal fashion, and he prospered in their care.

He learned to navigate the village and country paths with canes his father hewed for him, and he grew up seemingly at peace with his disability. Braille’s bright and creative mind impressed the local teachers and priests, and he was accommodated with higher education. He excelled in his education and received scholarship to France’s Royal Institute for Blind Youth.

While still a student there, he began developing a system of tactile code that could allow blind people to read and write quickly and efficiently. Inspired by the military cryptography of Charles Barbier, Braille constructed a new method built specifically for the needs of the blind. He presented his work to his peers for the first time in 1824.

In adulthood, Braille served as a professor at the Institute and had an avocation as a musician, but he largely spent the remainder of his life refining and extending his system. It went unused by most educators for many years after his death, but posterity has recognized braille as a revolutionary invention, and it has been adapted for use in languages worldwide.

So the sarcasm is that exactly the action which was initially tragic for him – piercing lether with an awl – is what was needed for him not only to focus on creating blind-signs, but it is also the elevation from piercing material which is the way to make signs palpable. And without that he would have just been any 43 year old man who by now is long forgotten, but now he is remembered over centuries.
Additionally this made me realise:
Whilst we define reality on our physical senses of seeing, hearing, smelling/tasting and touching, who is to say that we don’t also that the (in my eyes wrongly named) “extrasensory” perceptions or  psychic abilities such as intuitiontelepathypsychometryclairaudience, and clairvoyanceprecognition and retrocognition, are not something which everyone should have? (In ancient text there certainly are references as to times in which most humans were capable of those.)

So are not most of us disabled and just don’t (want to) know it?

So maybe instead of worrying, complaining or being frustrated about a loss of part of the tiny physical realm we rather should focus on reclaiming our long lost spiritual abilities by elevating our presence by any means necessary (as described in my still ongoing series about keys to understanding the universe).

In todays brainwash of advertisements we are guided through excitement towards buying certain products by insinuating that life would be “all about being able to have (most youthful) fun right now”. So now you ask you why this is damaging? Because the ever lasting excitement misses out on necessary guide-rails which protect us from deep suffering.

A huge part of life are the principles of Saturn which you could see as the checkout in a supermarket: At one point you have to pay for what you did put (mentally) in your basked (throughout your entire life). Looking at history: at no point in history was society focussed merely on having fun (except in decadent times amongst a tiny elite, such as Roman emperors), so because we are tricked by psychology  into buying into the pleasure centers or our brains, we overlook the largest aspects of our lifes.

Think of it: It is logical that materialistic pleasures (of our materialistic senses) can only cover 0.4% of it, when the vast majority of the universe is not matter to be experienced with those senses:

Since I do focus on my higher purpose, what I did so far interpret as health-inconveniences of ageing is slowly being replaced by me acknowledging physical issues as balustrades of my inner voice which protect me from straying away to far into the meaningless distractions of excitement. After all the outsourcing of our mind distracts from connecting to the source of ourselves and the universe – something which sorcerers . I won’t say that I am all content about my life at all, but in wise moments I remind me that:

  • My body did put on weight, because I wanted to protect myself from unsuitable sexual enocunters, which could have led me into longterm troubles,
  • my health-issues made me stop running around in order to learn stillness,
  • and what I often perceive as weaknesses are often sensitivities showing me what is right for me.

So whenever inner turmoil comes up, I remind myself of to compare myself to others who seemingly are better of than me, but to slowly walk backwards out of the maze I did entangle myself in for decades, and whenever the question “why me?” comes up, my answer is: “because … me“.

 

 

#health, #matter, #purpose, #senses, #spirituality